About your Search

20130121
20130129
SHOW
Book TV 37
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 172
SFGTV 116
CSPAN2 74
MSNBCW 70
CNNW 64
CNN 53
FBC 52
CSPAN 49
MSNBC 45
KQED (PBS) 33
FOXNEWS 30
KTVU (FOX) 28
WHUT (Howard University Television) 26
CNBC 25
KGO (ABC) 25
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 1174
Search Results 77 to 176 of about 1,181 (some duplicates have been removed)
you. thank you. >> where do began. no matter whether you know about education or not, let's turn to the banking world. investing in very young children is the best investment you can make. it has the greatest return on investment, and we know that because the first three years of life for the most important for cognitive, social, and emotional development. you are only two years old ones. that is the most significant window of time, and i think there must be an incident or a toddler in here, which brings me to the next point, yes we have class warfare, but it is unusual class warfare. those who are poor are completely left out. it is a bipartisan effort to keep people who are pouring out of the national dialogue. that is why i started witness to hunter, which is working to be able to provide direction testimony on their experiences on raising children in poverty, and i will tell you there are so many conversations. the fact people have been silent for so many years, that is a mass of a trail. the first thing the women who are poor will tell you is that poverty is solvable. they e
of the schoolkill center and peggy executive director of west harlem environmental education. so nice to have all of you at the table. folks who follow the story know the second part of the story is that the president is deposed by a military coup last year in 2012. the thing i love and hate about that story is yep, that's exactly the problem. we can't make big, sustainable international green policy because we are fighting, literally fighting over islands sinking into the ocean. here, too, we are continuing to fight over all these policy questions and politics questions and missing the big story, the big story that is affecting all of us. is there any way to get us refocused on international inner generational, sustainable and international? >> climate change. we all have skin and neck in it. polls show 49% of americans believe that climate change is occurring and that people have caused it. 24% say it's climate change, but not from people. i'm not sure what science people are waiting for at this point. there's so much more science in and more coming in all the time. none theless, it was great t
that our education and how it prepared us as women to be leaders and the fact that your mom was very much an activist involved in the peace movement and they need to know about her. and i said i'm working on this book. i said can i help you? get it published? this is how the journey began. >> host: bernice king your mother come to how active bushy and when did she begin her activism? was born in marion alabama? >> guest: ironically if you study history three of the leading persons in the movement ralph abernathy and my father i'll had wives from carrie county alabama. how ironic is that and mom did not know of one data abernathy. when the movement started they didn't know about them marrying different men in all of that kind of stuff and have brought it all together. and so growing up there in rural alabama with the father who was an entrepreneur or entrepreneur or leon and unheard of as an african-american had his own truck. he hauled lumber. he did open a sawmill and it was burned down by a white gentleman he hired. he would not let that stop them. implements a separate father's determi
is there jeopardy for us? >> so the notification and education program survey and early notification portions are the sort of the new pieces that aren't required by state law. we are using those outreach efforts, those outreach components to inform who we talk to in the actual statutory opt out phase. we are not suggesting that anyone who is going to be served by cleanpower sf would not receive an opt out notification. anyone who wishes to participate can participate which sounds like opting in, but we won't enroll them after we have included them in an opt out process. so i think we have worked with the city attorney on this to make sure we are accurately understanding our obligation and that our approach is consistent with it. we think it is. and so we're not always this careful with our language as we should be, but the actual steps will be anyone who says "let me in" will receive and be included in the opt out portion of the program. >> thank you. >> you're welcome. >> can i add also the people who are seen in the green area that are saying "i don't want to be in the program". they
francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you jumped ahead to several of my questions s
to balance california's budget. he also pushed for his priorities including education and regulatory reform. now, john, how would you rate his speech and what left the biggest impressions on you? >> well, you know, rating the speech, a speech from jerry brown is really tough to do because it's unlike any other speech you get from any other governor. how many governors go from the book of genesis to "the little engine that could" in one 25-minute speech? this was a vintage jerry brown speech. i think really what you saw here was a little bit of the governor running a victory lap. proposition 30 passed. temporary taxes passed. the budget looks a lot better. i think this was the governor's chance to pivot, to pivot to talking about what makes california great, how we get them back on track. don't worry, we're getting there. so i took this as a real optimistic speech with a lot of details, a lot of brown history facts. and really a message i think not only to the legislature but to the public of, like, i'm watching it. we're going to be careful, but we're going to move forward. >> and, john, yo
at the streets. the count 30 it is. >> want spending solution is improving education. just friday, a city funded university cut nearly 100 positions from its staff and faculty to actually save money. another top suggestion is refunding the money. >> that might help the economy. give the people a refund and they will spend the money. that will keep some people higher at and boost people a little bit. >> you don't have to go far to see someone in need. 15,000 people are homeless in d.c., including about 1000 families. >> there's a lot of homeless people year. >> here is the city council wish list -- topping it, homeless services welfare programs, and education for $9.5 billion. tomorrow, we should know more about the budget surplus. the city's chief financial officer will release the annual report and we might hear more from the mayor and city council as to what their ideas are. >> thank you. still to come, college graduates are being hit especially hard right now when it comes to finding work and their education could be the problem. >> taking a live look outside, we're lookin
structure, roads, bridges, things like that. also, educating the workforce. let us take a listen to one of the governor's and what he had the say during this state of the state address. this is the governor of new york talking about new york state. >> yes it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems. i know the issues. but, can you imagining how smart the state would be when we actually educate all of our children to the best of their god-given potential? when every black child and every white child and every orphan child and every other child is educated to their full potential? i know helping the state economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. but can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at full speed , and buffalo, and syracuse, and albany. i know women have been treated unfairly for a long time. i know it is cultural. i know it is historical. i know it is difficult. if it can you imagines what the society could achieve when our women fully participate as equal partners in ev
floor. that print studio is nationally known for its artwork and its educational programs. for the youth guidance center, i just spoke about the presentation that we did for the ada transition plan. we're requesting $400,000. that is to do all the design and architectural construction drawings and obtain building permits for a $3 million project to be funded in 2014-2015. we are also requesting some funds for miscellaneous general services projects. in our master planning efforts that go on to support all of these projects, that is at the level of $400,000. and let's see, we do have some other funding requests in 2014-15. under the plan, we must plan for a two-year cycle of budget requests. and also a ten-year capital plan request. so we're looking at sun setting our funding in 2015. and it will take us through 2015, almost all the way through that year to complete the construction of all of our projects. these funding requests are separate from curb ramp and sidewalk ada transition plan funding projects. all right? so these are the architectural buildings. and that is the end of my re
in education and we're not investing in the future of the children and the in the country and the global future of our world and i agree absolutely with everything you said. we're short changing our kids and not giving teachers the resources. there is mold in the teacher's work room. if i worked in the building that many children go to school in i wouldn't go to work either and in answer to your question there is a priority here about education that's not quite right. >> and while we're earmarking money i would totally support that and i feel that we should train teachers in digital media. you can't teach cooking out a kitchen, so we need to bring digital media into the classroom so people can practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context.
of educating our public and all the other kids and families in our city. this is a way of our quality of life, we cannot accept human trafficking. part of the way to do that is to have this be part of the kids education, and push strongly. the collaborative this year, allow the youth of san francisco to enter in a poster contest to provide artistic ability to the messaging of this really important movement. the 2013 poster contest winners i get to announce. i will begin with third-place winners. the third-place winner, first one eighth-grade student, from james brannan middle school. shelley lu (sounds like) apl(applause) also an eighth-grade student from james dunham as well, stella lee. thank you. apl(applause) (applause) to be an eighth-grader. the collaborative has chosen for the second place at 12 greater, from abraham lincoln high school. stephanie chung (applause) and then we have a number of first place winners. i'm sure this is all about collaboration, talking about it, what it means absorbing the purpose and working together. the first place poster altogether for all of us
of the mlk research and education institute at stanford. he joins us tonight from colorado. always good to have you back on this program. >> great to be with you. tavis: at the king day to you. what do you make of the fact that, on this day, we do not just celebrate the legacy and life of dr. king, but the first african-american president inaugurated for the second time? >> there is so much to celebrate on this day and so much to remember about the part of king's dream that has not been fulfilled. particularly the issue of poverty. there are so many things that make us thankful that the civil- rights reforms were achieved. i think it is important, particularly on this day, to remember that, if king were around, he would be pushing us to deal with that have -- that pestering issue of poverty. tavis: why is it that you think that, with all the evidence supporting the notion that pozner -- the poverty is threatening our democracy, it is a matter of national security, one out of two americans are either in or near poverty, the younger you are, the more likely you are to be in poverty, these
are not scholars. they are not someone who comes from an educational background or was taught that in their household. they do not know how to differentiate how to make the right choices. they just know what they have been taught. i am speaking from personal experience. i went to high school and i graduated with a 1.7 gpa. we ran the school, literally. i went to kennedy high school in richmond. it is surrounded by three or four different components. constant shootings -- three or four different hoods. we had to have our varsity football games during school hours. we cannot have it at 7:00 because of the potential danger. there was constant substitute teachers, a lot of bucks. -- lack of books. this is what they are teaching us. not saying that it is a total reason for why it and others turn out the way that we turned out, but it plays a part. just like i have to be held accountable for the choices i make, and so does a society. >> i keep hearing the term gang. in the black community in the bay area, it is a community, it is not a gang. you can move up in their ranks as if you
, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comment. but really i wo
notification and education plan there, the framework is clear and i think it's a good starting point to move forward for the city and i believe that while we have had comments about talking about caution i think they're well meaning how to have a successful program but i think the success of the program is that we roll out quickly with the notification and the education plan. that's going to be most meaningful. i also want to make sure that we're really clear that the effort is really working in the deep green areas first and foremost where we know a particular target audience is for the message and we know how to craft that message for them as well. i think that is going to be significant. we're not reaching out to every population in san francisco from the get go but the deep green area is where we need to focus the efforts on. this plan incorporates that and i believe it's the right way to go. i would like to move forward approving something today that can later be implemented early next year and hopefully we can move that in that direction. commissioner olague. >> yeah. i just wan
challenge that harvard business school faces today? >> business education in america itself has become stagnant. all of the growth in business schools is in places like china and india and brazil and eastern europe. we're a great american business school in a great american century. people came to the united states because they thought that this was the center of management practice and management innovation. but now if you were to try and educate leaders who have to operate in the world in what i you this of as this new global century of business by teaching them just about american education, i think we would be irresponsible to our mission of educating leaders who make a difference in the world. >> in a nutshell the biggest challenge that you face is competition? >> yes. it seems surprising. you would think there isn't a competition for harvard business school, but people are coming up with different models. we have students, all 900 of our students in the first year are currently in january scattered all around the world, trying to understand globalization. they've all been asked t
commitment to education and assist businesss in noe valley on disability access requirements. the noe valley merchants' the association understands that continued disability outreach and education is about maintaining the economic preservation of their merchant corridor and it is the only merchants association in san francisco that has established a standing committee to develop comprehensive outreach -- excuse me. that establishes a standing committee and developed a comprehensive outreach and education program and assist businesses that are in pre-and post-litigation. the small business commission commends the noe valley merchants association as an outstanding merchants association not only for their dedication to the businesss in their districts, but also for being a strong citywide and statewide voice for businesses and individuals with disabilities around the issue of disability access compliance. so thank you. [ applause ] so i just have a few other notes. is that the noe valley merchants association has made this a standing committee. and they twice a month have an ongoing meeting, w
of my dad imprisoned and now pursuing my education, i would say there is not one answer. the answer is that there is not an answer. you have brought about by bringing this conversation forum. it is not just law enforcement perspective, it is not just the community-based perspective, it is not just the research perspective, it is a multi- layered approach. first and foremost, we do have to consider meeting youth where they are act. we are talking about perpetrators of violence or what not or system involved or involved in gangs, we have to meet them where they are at. pain and hurt produces more hurt, right? what is fundamental it is addressing back pain -- addressing that pain. not looking at folks in a punitive way and saying, this guy is notorious, we have to lock him up. that person is hurting. he might have been abused, you know. first and foremost, we need to meet that individual's needs. i am pursuing a master's in social work. i have that lens. we need to heal our communities and take those answers upon ourselves. everybody has already -- we sure this in perspective, but defi
it is -- yeah. 60 seconds there? [applause] >> and you, daniel, what is your 60-second idea? >> as an educator and teacher, i think my 60-second idea to change the world is better education. if we could teach the next generation of kids to be critical thinkers, just not accept what they are told but to decide for themselves, to give them the tools to make informed decisions about what is right and what is not, about what has been established and what is just here say, what really has a grounding in fact versus rumor, i think the world would be a much safer, more peaceful, and more prosperous place. [applause] >> let's get a big, final round of applause for this nice, informed foray into neuroscience and music with myself, daniel levinson, and the great guitarist and composer, alex degrassi. now, this meeting of in forum and the commonwealth club is adjourned. [applause] >> you're watching quick bites, a look at san francisco foods. today you're in for a real treat. oh, my. food inspired by the mediterranean and released with a twist so unique you can only find it in one place in san francisco.
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
those in the chat room today, parents, educators and a lot of questions about how the vice president's personal views on gun ownership jived with their hopes of curbing gun vie lechbls he answered that one right away. >> and so my view is that it is totally a guarantee not negotiable that i'm able to own a weapon for sporting purposes as well as my own protection. but there should be rational limits on the type of weapon i can own. >> reporter: as for guns in schools, he could see putting an officer in a school, armed or unarmed, depending how parents and teachers feel. mr. bind also went on to say woe support researcher into whether or not video games contribute to violent breeze i have or. the chat lasted a little more than half an hour. diane? >> thanks a lot, scott. >>> it is official today, outgoing defense secretary leon panetta lifted the ban on women serving in combat positions. the move comes after a decade of war in afghanistan and iraq. more than 1,000 women were injured, 150 killed in those wars. the change is scheduled to go into effect by march 15th h the ban had been i
other children as well, and detectives want to hear from additional victims. >> the u.s. education department announced today that every public school in america will have to include stid yents with disabilities in after school sports programs. >> we're not talking about physical education for kids with disability that's exists. this would mean allowing thom participate in after school sports. now, school woz have to make reasonable modifications for them, or they would have to reyait a kind of alternative. sophia's fancy foot work gained her a spot on the soccer team. we're surprised when she showed us her prosthetic leg. >> this is the liner. her school encourages all students, including those with disabilities to tryout for any sport. >> there is nothing different about me except for my legs. and i can just deal with that. >> and in cases the school makes the proper adom daigs autos a child hearing impaired we may need visual cues. whether there is something else for a child that needs something. >> willard doing a lot whaft u.s. department of education will require schools to d
that the education system must instill the value of strong minds and that brings strong change. take your child to school. meet your child's teachers. exchange numbers. turn the tv off at night. take a report card every nine weeks and take your child to religious celebration once a week. most of the violence is from the bottom up, not top down. mothers say something like "i'm going to beat you boy. i'm going to beat you so the police don't have to do it one day". it was their own way of saying get some home training, some home cultivation is a big fact in the social order and we must restore homes but unemployed parents don't do as good job as parents with jobs. i'm all about welfare back to work. there are four steps involved. one the parents must have day care. if you leave the child without day care you're called an unfit parent and are arrested. you need day care. you need transportation and job training and a job. you need those four steps. what gives you an advantage in san francisco with the mayor across the bay and mayor lee here you have leaders that care. we have leaders h
to continue their education. middle school to college today we'll talk about some of the programs that help students stay in school. first, the dropout rate for oakland's unified district was 26.6%. that is higher than the national average. joining us to talk about is the numbers and with a administrators is doing about is the spokesperson, is troy flint. >> thanks for having me. >> cheryl: 26.6%, you must be doing a lot to address the issues? >> it's one of the most critical issues. districts across the country particularly urban districts. there is no one comprehensive solution. we're attacking it from null of angle that has address the social components that gets kids disenchanted with schools. >> cheryl: you have a different population in schools especially as they progress? >> we are predominantly low income district, 70% of our students qualify for free lunch program. as you elementary to middle, it increases. poverty is a factor in some of these negative outcomes but it shouldn't be did he term in an event. that is determinant. so that is why we are drying trying a address these issu
it was. education has moved on hugely. i think in terms of the progress to the things we would understand, and there has been a momentum. it has progressed to an extraordinary way. >> the taliban had not gone away. soon afghan security forces will have to fight them on their own. the man who led the intelligence war for most of the last 10 years said the attacks are set to get worse. >> it reduces this. the taliban are going to change their tactics. they are going to modify their strategy. there are going to do more and more spectacular attacks. >> like this one on our first morning in cobble, a triple suicide bombing. officials told us on average there are four such attacks for every week. we went to see what security was like. here the government is offering them money to give up guns and reintegrate themselves into village communities. it is having mixed results. >> the man behind me were told the problem we have is no means of knowing. even if they are, the numbers are so very small. to 6000 integrating. >> the details are registered diametrically. while we were there, at a ballmer ki
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
of the commission. >> president carter appointed you. >> carter appointed me when i left his education, running education. yet in the department of education and i went back to teaching at the appointed me to the commission. >> at what point to become the the u.s. civil rights commission will become a permanent agency? >> after the first year when the reports that they did -- with the commission did was instead of sitting down and saying, okay. we are here as a safety valve and don't really -- they did some hearings. major power that the commission has, and a point this out in the book. to me it is the most important thing about the commission. does what it is supposed to do it will go out and listen to people that nobody else will listen to. problems, civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention, not just local people but the federal government. it would write letters, do all kinds. no one would pay any attention. the sole rights commission decided that first year it would go out and listen to these people and see what they had to say. they had the powe
of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young people, particul
of linking education with worse force development. making the united states more economically competitive by investing in community colleges, by improving our education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that he can lead four years from now with a america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity. >> i have to check in with the reporters around town. brooke baldwin. can you hear me? >> reporter: you hear correctly. i can barely hear myself speak. i'm a southern girl. it's my perfect place. they're playing a very significant song right now. this is simple plman. i was talking to them backstage. they say this is the one song they sing. they sing at concerts like this all the time. we have heroes in the room. our men and women in military. many of them in wheelchairs to my right who have made it out here. they are trying to move forward. the guys in the band say the song just resonates. neez men a these men and women are simple men and women. yourself missing out. >> you look absolutely the part in that dazzling outfit. let me move to anot
in terms of linking education with workforce development. making the united states more economically competitive in the 21st century global economy investing in community colleges, improving the education system and linking that with the business sector. if he can do that, he can leave four years from now with an america with a better economy and much more well positioned for prosperity in the 21st century. >> wait a moment. we have to check in with reporters around the town now. brooke baldwin at the red, white and blue ball. brooke, can you hear me? you are with military leaders and lynyrd skynyrd, i hear. >> you hear correctly, my friend. i can barely hear myself speak and so glad you came to me. i don't know if you can hear. i'm a southern girl. i'm in my perfect place hearing the southern rock band lynyrd skynyrd. playing a significant song. this is "simple man." i was talking to them backstage and they said they sing at concerts all the time. that is hero's red, white and ball here in washington. the men and women of military, many of these guys just in wheelchairs to my right
education about half the price of what is normal. we'll tell you how they do it, coming up. ♪ david: according to a report released today by the national retail federation, retail sales are expected to rise 3.4% in 2013. this looks good but this is significantly lower than the 4.2% growth in 2012. cheryl: higher payroll raises and coming fiscal cliff drama expected to weigh on the consumer spending but he says outlook looks pretty bright. he says he was named a rising star in wall street research by institutional investors. congratulations. on that. luxury took a bit of a hit in 2012. the sector overall, we saw the middle tier players jumping back in. why do you say luxury will come back this year once again? >> i'm excited about it. the market stablized to a certain extent. we're seeing better performance above $500 price points. there is enthusiasm am and the rich continue to be riff. david: talk about the high-end with tiffany. we mentioned tiffany before. this is one of the best brands in the world. you men's the name tiffany, is almost a word in of itself. some people complaine
funds our priorities. it proposes an increase in funding for education. including full-day kindergarten and we fully fund the teachers pension each of the next two years. [applause] education funding represents 64% of our state expenditures. in addition, we provide $18 million over the next few years to ensure that all hoosier workers have the skills that they need to find a job in today's economy. [applause] since i believe that we need new jobs, we are investing nearly $350 million in excess reserves on indiana's roads and bridges and infrastructure of today and tomorrow. [applause] our budget creates a partnership and because indiana is agriculture, we envision our state becoming a hub of agricultural breakthroughs by supporting the development of an agricultural court order. indiana will continue to lead across the midwest and the world. [applause] our budget also ensures that the indiana economic development corporation is adequately equipped to attract more to the hoosier state and to operate with greater transparency and accountability to the public. [applause] lastly, it was abr
, the education. we should have spent less and save more. we should have borrowed a lot less from foreigners. one of the things a lot of people don't get, housing is consumption because people think that they invested in the house they think it's an investment. it's not. we consume a house just like an automobile if you over invest in housing what you are doing is over consuming. so a massive over consumption. it's analogous to the agricultural example. and in that process, we taught millions of people how to do the wrong thing. we taught them how to be mortgage bankers, residential legal attorneys, those millions of people are trying to learn to do something new that is productive and a global economy which is one reason it's been so it difficult to deal with what i imply that. in addition, construction is competitive with manufacturing rates. if you drive of construction wages you try to find a factor in wages which we do with an artificial construction boom and that drew millions of manufacturing jobs overseas to places like india and china. initially the people in india and china didn't know
. that is how we got obamacare, a federal education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that p
education department, and they drug war. the voters they do something. that's why i wrote my book, "no, they can't." as we begin, what can we do it we disagree with president obama's big government vision? mark meckler and starlee rhoades has some ideas. they have the citizens for self-governance. starlee rhoades is president of the goldwater institute. both say we can return power to the states. what do you mean? start with obamacare. >> state should establish health insurance exchanges. twenty-five states said go right ahead, the policy on your own. you will have to implement it on your own watch. it protects and stops massive subsidies from being paid out from insurance companies and it protects people from being told on by the irs. john: the exchange is a place where you go on the web and it helps you buy an insurance policy. he insurance does that at no cost to the taxpayer. i don't know why it has to be such a big deal or cost so much. >> that is what the federal government will do, and extinction each day. but the thing that is great about that policy change is having the federa
to succeed in today's market place. despate progress in education, too many of our schools are still lagging behind, some way behind and especially heart breaking to this father, one in five hoosier children lives in poverty. that is simply unacceptable. [applause] with so many families and business struggling just to get by we have no choice but to remain bold. we have to do better and we will do better and doing better starts with the right priorities. by adopting a road map that says yes to our future and believes in the ununlimited potential of our people and it start by making job creation job one in this assembly and all over this state. [applause] that's why on day one of our administration i signed a moratorium on any regulations to ensure that indiana is not burdening hoosiers employ remembers unnecessary red tape and that's why we proposed a job budget last week. our budget is honestly balanced holds the line on spending, funds our priorities, builds our reserves and it lets hard working hoosiers keep more of what they earned. now let's be clear: government doesn't create jo
of the funds to come to the city and council to defray the costs and acts of service and to educate small businesses on action steps to achieve accessibility compliance. dbi is meeting with the office of small business to determine the most appropriate use of these very limited funds. and which are the result of passage of senate bill, 1186 by the state legislature last september so that is something that is important to us based on the conversations in the past. >> acting director, director and i have recently met with the office of small business to executive director to discuss ongoing compliance issues around the number of vacant commercial storefronts. >> it does not appear that it could effectively address, vacant storefronts especially in buildings otherwise occupied. we remain available for follow up discussions on these issues. these conversations are helpful and we obviously can't accomplish the goals all of the time. but at least the communication we can come up with creative ways of assisting these issues to the department. >> dbi along with other departments is participating
to make a motion to divide the question. one, about the 1.1 million dollars about the public education enrichment fund and separately 843 million dollars from the general fund's stays federal reserve. initially i wanted us to divide the file entirely to send two files to the mayor who indicated that he would sign it so that we could get the 1.1 million to the school district immediately. >> motion to divide is not debatable. will consider those two items. supervisor mar. >> i want to support the whole -- supplemental brought by supervisor kim. i want to speak to the accountability of the school district. another the former school board president, norman yee and others have successfully brought the school district to a stronger financial state. they have achieved a perfect score in the recent audit; never before has any governmental agency seen that. it's a good testament to the work that the former president of the school board jay kim and our colleague norman yee have done. also the sfusd action plan to presented the plan at the previous financial meeting showed that it was mone
of -- [unintelligible] it means i have been educated with women. when were very important for me, my grandmother, my mother. they give me and show me threw themselves an example of what women wear. women that were strong, a clever, human. and at the same time, sometimes stronger than men. so that i realized very quickly that women could be more interesting, more clever, because of maybe education or maybe because of the fact that they have not played football, to be quiet, you know, more into things to obtain. to obtain something. they have to be 10 times more clever than the men. they have everything it themselves already at the base. >> that we already know we are 10 times more intelligent. [laughter] >> yes. i mean, like, men did not realize that most of the time. even if the need. the need, you know. so that, you know, truly, i felt the power of the woman. at the time, also like the woman at sleeve and that kind of thing. we admit -- we -- women reacting on taking out the bra and putting it on fire. the fire of the bra. a symbol. showing that we are as much as the men. maybe we first tried to lo
. that there is one more thing. so the educational system in college. i think there should be services for financial aid for individuals with disabilities. as you are abruptly thrown into the world with lots of action going on and it's a very hard transition. particularly if you are furthering your education, for folks with disabilities, particularly with financial aid. this is why most individuals don't go to college. that is all, thank you. >> thank you. are there any council members who have a comment or question? go ahead idell. >> thank you. thank you everyone for coming out here today. i have to apologize, i have been sick, so i didn't even know that the meeting would have happened. i would have had a lot more people here. sorry about that, but the next time we do this, which i know this won't be last one, it will be go. what i wanted to say is having access -- she was talking about the internet -- having cable or something at a reasonable price. we have people with disabilities and seniors just siting this their house just looking at wall because they cannot afford cable or a telephone
, we are well trained. we do not come out there as police officers. we are into education and training. we are not looking to enforce. we tried to instill the idea that the security plan is paramount, providing the framework by which an establishment protect itself from inappropriate behavior and criminal acts for a working relationship with the community and the police. there is that umbrella of security and personnel. we looked at the management to hire the appropriate personnel. hiring, training, and supervision. everything that you need. all of our problems come from the over service of alcohol. we ask for owners to train for over service. we also look for physical security measures, like scanning. additional parking and security of the exterior is important. we think that an ongoing plan management -- constantly as cds nightclub owners assessing management. it is readjusted when necessary. the bottom line is they have a great security plan and they will limit their liability. it is all about making money and defending yourself against liability. that is what we try to preach to cl
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
years now, the first day of my second term, has been one of continuous education. i want to thank you for that. i want to introduce my family. i'm getting emotional. first off my beautiful wife karen cepeda [sounds like]. (applause) together we have two kids, renee and emiliana who are in school today. we have been through what close couples go through in terms of raising kids and facing adversity and figuring out how to make a household work. it has been wonderful 15 years. my mom is year, linda parks and stepfather. (applause) i think that what i really got % most of all from my mom % is really how to think and be thoughtful about the people. and i take that with me wherever i go. i draw inspiration from being around people. i want to say thank you for my life and what you have given me. my stepfather joe has given me a great opportunity, never expected that and i want to thank you for that. i wanted to do is my dad, hector avalos. it's time for resemblance i tihnk, for the gray look. my dad is important to me as well and taught me about the value of work. working with oth
deeper anymore. i don't have a formal education in i.t., however, i have deployed some systems when i was working for the industry, and i brought in young, energetic staff to help. we implemented this. it took three months. people knew when they were going to get paid. i think we have a happy contractor community. >> these system improvements have really it increased service to our clients and reduced costs and really improved the bidding environment for our contractors. it's remarkable what she has done. >> been a public service -- being a public servant is a good thing. i love my job. i would never exchange it for anything else in the world. [applause] [applause] >> i am from the department of public works. i have the honor of introducing jocelyn quintos. i will just a real quick, jocelyn works very hard. through her work, a lot of contracts and a lot of work that she does -- she has brought new systems that have saved a lot of tand time and allowed us to give contracts and make payments very fast. please meet jocelyn. [applause] >> first of all, i just want to thank spur and mfac f
the state education code, a misdemeanor child abuse conviction is not enough reason to fire a teacher. but the parents were not buying the explanation. one sobbing mother expressed the fear all of them felt that their children may have been hurt too. >> i have no idea what went on in this classroom. [ crying ] >> reporter: at the center of the storm, dina holder, convicted of throwing a 5-year-old autistic child to the floor and kicking him in a classroom 2.5 years ago. after it was reported, the district merely transferred her to another school. it was this woman's child. >> i don't care what's written down in a procedures manual or anything like that. i think that should be should have took a stand and said we need to get her away from kids. >> reporter: other parents say they want the school superintendent fired. >> for the district to subject our most fragile children is appalling, disgusting. we need answers. >> reporter: but the school district did not have the answers they wanted. >> we followed the advice of legal council under the state education code of california. >> that s
, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from in a minute, he was there, i know ter theresa sparks was there, i was so
was going to follow up in the conversation with digital media or literacy needed within the educational system. we are still experiencing digital divide and access and just the one you speak of recently officer when you mention the generations and investigators not engaged with this media and no don't know my book or face space and when you have to look at youth culture. we talk about texting and sexing and omg and i didn't text anything to you. i spoke to and part of the language and how they engage so until we look at the culture of young people and how do we impact today's 20th century media culture we can't make a huge impact in regards to bullying or electronic aggression or whatever name we want to place on it and is affecting the students and i am excited you're addressing this issue and it's a crucial time for this generation and if we don't take serious this conversation today and action tomorrow we will see more and more issues arise. [applause] >> and i'm going to cap it up and i totally agree with that and one of the resources i want you to point is out is the family inst
this morning that included a big change for education. >> reporter: this state of the state address was unlike others. there were no calls for deep cuts but that is not to say the governor didn't put forth a challenging agenda. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: governor jerry brown's speech was in a word optimistic. >> california is back. budget is balanced and we are on the move. let's get it done. thank you. [ cheers and applause ] >> reporter: he called to build a rainy day fund and to support major products. and california's high-speed rail. on higher education, money must be saved. >> tuition increases are not the answer. i am not going to let the students become the finance ears. >> reporter: it is the proposal for k-12 that is the biggest change, shifting money to schools with poor students. >> equal treatment for children in unequal situations is not justice. >> the idea of giving them more resources is the right direction. >> the battle lines may not be political. she says the governor's plan would benefit schools in her district. >> that will not be a fight between republicans an
the next year. we plan to have quarterly meetings and have them include educational component to help dwns the mutual knowledge and guide the work and continue to have robust exchanges among ourselves and the key agencies and cal-ema and fema and others providing resources post disaster so thank you. >> thank you very much. that was very informative. thank you. i would like to ask now john boseman to come join me who is the government affairs manager for boma and the mayor mentioned it early ye today. i think john has a one minute film he's going to show and he's also going to be -- as you know in each of the agenda's we ask a community partner to come up and do a brief presentation so we know what they're up to so john i turn it over to you. >> thank you. i appreciate it. happy friday afternoon. it's an honor to be here with so many distinguished city leaders. i am humbled and admiral thank you for your good work. it's an honor to be in the same room. who knows what this is? good. that sames me time. i'm here to talk about the importance of this room and building and the good wo
in our kids education, to draw from our state reserve to put us further in the hole to me is the wrong approach. >> supervisor campos. >> supervisor campos i would like to begin by welcoming once again our newly elected colleagues, supervisors yee and breed. it is exciting when we take our own new board of supervisors, and i look forward to working with you. there are many votes that we cast in this chamber and in some respects it is only fitting that one of the first votes that this new board starting its new term takes is his vote. this is one of the most important issues that we will be dealing with in one of the most important vote that we will be taking as his term proceeds. supervisor kim, i want to thank you for your leadership but i want to piggyback about what supervisor avalos said, talking about in some respects two different cities. and what happens to some people in san francisco. we are a city of great wealth. we have because of a lot of different reasons we are fortunate enough that we have more resources in san francisco then many places throughout the state and throu
heartburn. satisfaction guaranteed or your money back. >>> before brown versus board of education, there was another directive by harry s. truman which banned diskrcrimination o anyone in the military regard l regardless of race, creed or religious beliefs. it with was a historical truth that the u.s. military described as an engine of war by progressives has been a leading institution for fight for racial equality, and because the military leaders carry great weight with many americans, i thought i would remind one american in particular just where the military stands on a decision he will be making very soon. my letter this week is to supreme court chief justice john roberts as he considers a challenge to the affirmative action program at the university of texas. dear chief justice roberts, it is me, e melissa. remember last june you were the deciding vote to uphold the affordable health care act, yeah? well, that was a cool way to ensure the legacy and in truth, it gave me faith that despite your ideologically derived positions and the willingness to overturn established preced
representing a wide area of government agencies, law enforcement agencies, service providers, educators and community members. we are committed to ending human trafficking through collaboration, education, outreach, raising awareness and supporting survivors of human trafficking. how many cities have this kind of public private cooperation? i don't know but we are among the first and speaks about the efforts put forth in the city but isn't this the city where all things that are impossible can happen? i wanted to just a few people who are here. first and foremost the honorable mayor ed lee. and supervisor carmen chu, has been a great champion. the winners of the sf cat annual poster concert and the keynote speaker, -- a human traffic survivor and advocate. i want to say that other human rights commissioners are here, -- and vice chair doug chen, -- commissioner, the president julie -- nancy kirshner rodriguez, police chief greg sur (sounds like) -- i will like to turn this over to mayor lee.diana are you here? he is on his way. well - thank you. why don't we do that? why waste a
, how do you do it? >> this is an old-fashioned word but it's education and taking them to the step-by-step process and they basically programmed. they're told early, a lot of times in the home. and i have i have had instances where the parents have the gun. >> right judge and i have to deprogram the way of thinking. it takes time, they resistent. >> yeah. >> and my question, do you. to stay alive and free? this is not going to get you what you want. >> exactly. and one of the things everyone is talking about, of course s violence in the media and in video games to whatk tent do you see that -- what extent do you see that impacting you? >> that is in the pot. the media is part of it, and music for my kids is a big part of it. >> it is. >> and when you're listening to the lyrics. i listened to that. >> yeah. >> i know what kids are thinking. there is a group from chicago and a guy said i throw my money to the sky because heaven pays me and the next whole stanza is about violence. >> and a lot of artists, he's fulling -- fueling this. >> yeah. >> he's a wrap rapper and is able to go i
, and she find it too tough. and she probably decided that education is the right way to go. i don't know if they are going to stick together very long. she has a dream and i think that's wonderful. and she has a courage to make the dream come true. and going to college definitely going to help her to make her dream come true. i think that's wonderful. kevin, i can write my songs on a computer. they have a computer lab. it opens up the possibilities of song composition... what's the possibility of getting some food in this house soon? i'm going grocery shopping tomorrow. put what you want on the list. i can't believe how many forms i have to fill out. i can't believe we're out of cereal. put it on the list. o.k. rebecca... casey. 1097 e street. apartment number 3. boston, mass. 02168. we're almost out of peanut butter. i just bought that jar. hey, look, a coupon. two for the price of one. just... i know-- put it on the list. phone number. (617) 686-7731. age: 28. father: patrick casey. mother: margaret casey, deceased. we should get more cookies. ( sighs ) gee, they want to know everythin
year of the washington. you want to start an interesting conversation. ask this well-educated well- connected crowd. what was more important, the first time barack obama was elected. first african american president or the fact that he was just real. let's go inside. i want to tell you some of what they had to say. >> reporter: the historic theater was jumping on stage with the kind of jazz they want to improve. >> i want them to leave the president alone. >> reporter: but outside the upscale gathering waited. >> they have a little more power. >> they have supported president barack obama a second time. and their money, their campaign, and their votes. >> mitch mcconnell said he would be a one-term president. four years ago a line of symbolism and it was. a lot of people are telling us tonight they are looking for programs from the president from this point on. >> on gun controls, barack knows what to do. >> i'd like to see him focus more on education. everything starts with education. >> reporter: they are headlining this private inaugural party. planning to be here well into the
children to read can sometimes be a difficult task but one school developed a fun and education hallway to make reading fun. our education reporter sherrie johnson introduces us to boys, books and basketball. >> look at this shirt. it's a great shirt. >> reporter: it's 8 a.m. at steven forest elementary school in columbia. school doesn't start for another 45 minutes but the library is packed with fourth and fifth grade boils. it's part of the program that's a book club for selected boys who need a boost in reading and confidence. >> the more you a read, the -- you read, the better you can spell. >> reporter: they alternate book club discussions one week and basketball the next book. after the book discussion, it as time to hit the courts. school data shows males are falling behind female students in reading. this program is turning things around. >> it's a gel it make them lifelong leaders, not just this year, but i want them to learn to love reading. as they leave us and go into middle and high school, i want them to continue to pick up books. >> reporter: they help one another and for
education. got a new department of education. >> host: at what point do you become for the civil rights commission would become a permanent agency in a sense? >> guest: after the first year , what the commission did this instead of sitting down seine which is here as a safety valve, they different hearings. the major power the commission had an ipod this in the book continues the most important thing. when it does what it's supposed to do, it will go out and listen to people nobody else will listen to. the civil rights problems that people had that they could not get anyone to pay attention. not just local people, but the federal government would write letters. nobody would pay attention. the civil rights commission decided they would go out of that they had decided and they had the power under the statute to subpoena anyone. eisenhower said the reason i want to get it passed by congress to set up an executive orders because my attorney general tells me that's the only way they can subpoena anybody. some people may not want to come to testify, said the commission has the most important
almost four years ago as an educational arm of their work. and we would have dinners and a few classes and we understood there what momentum that people wanted this type of engagement and education in a way that allowed for a more in-depth conversation. we grew and now we offer -- i think we had nine, we have a series where adults learned home cooking and we did a teacher training workshop where san francisco unified public school teachers came and learned to use cooking for the core standards. we range all over the place. we really want everyone to feel like they can be included in the conversation. a lot of organizations i think which say we're going to teach cooking or we're going to teach gardening, or we're going to get in the policy side of the food from conversation. we say all of that is connected and we want to provide a place that feels really community oriented where you can be interested in multiple of those things or one of those things and have an entree point to meet people. we want to build community and we're using food as a means to that end. >> we have a wonderful or
simple, understandable concepts as to the foundation of your case and you have to do that to educate the jury and to educate the judge. a lot of these people have not dealt with graffiti cases. you have somebody professing to be an expert and ask the questions thateled his expertise and this guy does not know. it puts a big hole in his expertise right off. so we wanted to have something consistent. now if you probably present this information, it will essentially establish the officer as a credible expert. at that point you can start rendering expert decisions. in trainings that you go to should be set up in such a way that every jurisdiction has an expert. sometimes you have to piggy back on somebody else's expertise. that will come in handy when he can talking to city hall people about allocation of resources, to his department about al case of resources, how he is going to set up the program and how he is going to make the investigations and how he is going to successfully take them to court? and there are experts in here, i know and i know they know if you have kind of knowle
education to their business clients. we had 13 applications for getting assistance to go forward and getting a first walk through and getting an assessment for access abilility. we'll all pleased with this. i'm sure more about come through. and then small business saturday november 30th of 2013 we're going to be starting this earlier with the american express and is chamber to start planning for that. and then the retreat is february 26th is it? or excuse me. . february 25th. and so as i mentioned i will be meeting with president adams to work on the agenda but also will be reaching out to each one of the commissioners to talk to you about the retreat and what you would like to see worked on. legislation wise are having a quiet legislative - not much legislation has been introduced. next meeting you will be hearing is tobacco register restriction. we're going to get a presentation about clove restrictive ice areas. there are several throughout this community and you'll be able to hear with the alcohol restrict areas. and then the c r v the outreach committee will be reviewing the. draft an
on and that is educational. the lathe operator now replaced by a machine . the guy who operates that is a guy with computer knowledge. we are not educating our work force to support the kind of tech lodgical economy that we are going through. >> johnathon a new high in the stock market makes us take our eye off of the ball on unemployment. >> i am glad to see the market up, eric. but president obama's recovery is worst in moderp history . i think wayne's point all of the entitlements that we built up. that intervention prolongs the crisis and worsens the crisis. a lot of the countries that have systemic unemployment. france never had that low since the 1980s. bigger government grows and bigger medockity grows. >> if things are so good out of washington d.c. and hear it out of the obama administration on the recovery. how come 47 million americans are on food stamps and the number that we spend on food stamps tripled under obama's watch? >> look, i agree with you. there is no recovery that we can measure here and you can point to how many people are out of work and lost their homes and on food stamps. we ne
of working on education issues for a very long time, i have come to realize that the civil rights laws are the most, have been historically the most sorely underutilized tools for change. it is in the context of civil rights as we talked about with the lgbt community. we have also, as tom mentioned, seen and we were reading about all too frequently a kind of bullying and harassment for students of certain religious groups. in our guidance we also made it clear while we don't have jurisdiction over religion in the same way we don't over sexual orientation, what we're seeing in all of these -- and all of these are case by case, you can't just broad sweep the laws -- when students are bullied and harassed in this world because of religion, in most instances a lot of that is not about race or religion, it's because. perception that students that share certain religious traits also share certain ethnicities and that is discrimination and that falls under title 6. it is not just about enforcing the laws that make it clear how the laws apply. it is, though, as we said, you can't get at this
to apologize for. first thought wrong properly filtered was some kind of rehabilitation or education or part of the c.o. or the p.d. or the d.a., helps first thought wrong become next right thing. you can do it. i can teach the incarcerated population what to want because they always get what they wanted. they wanted more, they got more. they got it, they got it. they want someday, they left with none. they wanted her or him, they got that. i can tell them what to want now. pass first thought wrong, what to want. they do the right work, i can show them how to keep it this time. my boy's safe all day. it's not because of me. it's because of efforts like this. [applause] >> as our panelists take the stage and get seated, let me introduce our discussion. earlier this year, california state senator mark leno introduced legislation that would revise the penalty for simple drug possession under the state law, making drug possession laws that punish as a felony would now be punished as a misdemeanor. the new legislation, sb-1506, does not apply to anybody involved in selling or manufacturing drugs.
? >> the evidence is compelling, education, human capital, people can work with information and technology. and many people in american society today, cannot afford by themselves to get that kind of education. you can make resources available to support younger people and families that is good for them, that is good for the economy, and that is good for the tax base. it is going to strengthen the budget. >> in terms of competitiveness worldwide, building a stronger work force, as you mentioned, early childhood education to college education is vital to american competitiveness, suspect it? >> is the number one determining informant. how much do we produce in this economy? number one, looking forward is human capital, that is about education, the ability to innovate and work with the new technologies. >> over the short run, what is the effect of across the board cuts on pell grants on research funding--for medical research and scientific research? >> it is all going to be negative for growth and human capital. it is also going to give you negative impact on the budget. >> while the most immediate con
with that in the best way you can. >> when i did the education outreach to federal judges, that's the biggest questions. generally they want to know can you help me do any better than my best clinical judgment? yeah, we can. we can design tests that can predict and they want to know how good can you get? risk assessments are getting better. they're getting a lot better. i look at risk assessments as i have identified the variables that promote risk so that i can develop treatment strategies to reduce those risks. so if you have somebody that scores very high in psychopathy and has all of the other risk factors that would suggest they're is an 80% chance of reoffending in four or five years, you can develop a tiered or strategic relief plan that would help mitigate those risk factors so that that person can be -- levels of risk can be brought down. that's how we think about risk management. i call it typically risk needs assessment, because once you understand the risks, then you can develop ways of mediating them and whether or not that's a brain difference or a picture of a scan or whatever it is, you
Search Results 77 to 176 of about 1,181 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)